A bit of history on E. Sarjeant’s carving tools

Today W.K. Fine Tools published this article:  History of Cutlery and Tools with Geoffrey Tweedale – Addis: A Famous Name in Carving Tools – By Geoffrey Tweedale.  The article inspired me to take a few pictures of E. Sarjeant’s carving tools and the makers stamps I saw while cleaning them.

Some of the makers stamps from the article.

Some of the stamps on the tools.

If you want to know more on these tool check out this link.

What’s so fun about restoring an old plane?

Well, using it after its all cleaned up and ready to go of course!

So that’s just what I did today.  Ernest and I ( 😉 ) went to work on the picture frame that I started before the giant tool score.  Its very fun to use a tool that I not only rehabbed, but that I know the story behind.  This particular Stanley No. 4 is a late 1800 early 1900 version.  Its so old that the blade adjuster turns in the opposite direction that typical Stanleys and for that matter, pretty much every other plane does.  If nothing else, it will remind me how old the plane is every time I use it.

Here’s a couple of pictures of Ernest’s old plane in action.

Restoring E. Sarjeant’s Hand Planes

So I was able to get Ernest’s hand planes into the bead blaster.  Also the new handle and tote arrived as well as the blade, so now for the sequence of pictures showing the restoration.  The handle on this plane was completely trashed so I replaced it with a Bill Rittner handle and tote set.  The blade was also worn down to the nub, so I replaced it with a Hock blade.  For a blow by blow on how I did it please see this post -> No. 3 Stanley Rehab.

Inheriting Tools

In 1980, I was in college and I met Peggy Sarjeant.  Peggy and her family very quickly became  and continue to be my second family.  Matter of fact, all these year later, she lives down the street and her parents (Bill and Faye) live a couple of hours north.  So on Friday, she sent me the following text – “We are cleaning out our crawl space and found a ton of antique tools that belonged to my grandfather. Do you have any interest in looking at them?”  Needless to say, I appeared at her house 10 minutes later. Here’s the spread.

So here’s a bit on Peg’s great grandfather.  Ernest Sarjeant was an cabinet maker’s apprentice / indenture for Thomas and William Lock for 1892 to 1897 in Bristol.  Once he came over to America, he continued his cabinet making business in Daytona, Florida making a table for the Capital Building in 1947.

Here was the first of many upcoming rehab projects that I’ll be taking on with these tools.  Ernest used his tools for many years and he used them up completely.  The dovetail saw is one of many examples.  He sharpened this saw so many times that there is no saw plate  left.  Literally, his last sharpening left marks in the handle where the plate is held.  I’ve purchased a new saw plate for the saw from Bad Axe Tool Works and will let you know how it all comes together.

In my next post, I hope to include information on E. Sarjeant’s apprentice / indenture papers.